Bell Nunnally Presents Eric Nadel’s Birthday Benefit for Grant Halliburton Foundation with Media Sponsor KXT 91.7

Celebrating its 11th year, the Eric Nadel Birthday Benefit supports the work of Grant Halliburton Foundation, a Dallas nonprofit that provides mental health education, training, and support to North Texas teens and families.

Headlining this year’s show is American soul singer Danielle Ponder! Danielle is both empowering and a powerhouse. NPR included Danielle on Slingshot’s 2023 list of Artists to Watch, and partner station KXT 91.7 noted, “The power behind her music could sway any jury of her peers into immediately becoming an instant fan.” In 2020, NPR described her music as “anthemic while compassionate; soulful, while bold and strong. She reverberates with a goosebump-inducing passion.”

Danielle attended Northeastern University where she received her Juris Doctorate. For five years, Danielle worked as a public defender where she provided criminal defense to the indigent community. While working as a public defender, Danielle also toured Europe and scored an opening spot with R&B singer and producer George Clinton. In 2018, after five years as a public defender, she made the gutsy decision to pursue her number one passion: music. In 2021, Danielle performed at the Newport Jazz Festival where her performance was hailed as one of the standout performances of the event. 2022 was a banner year for Danielle with appearances on “Late Night with Seth Meyers,” and “CBS This Morning,” as well as tours with Marcus Mumford, Amos Lee, St. Paul and the Broken Bones, and Leon Bridges.

Danielle’s debut album, “Some of Us Are Brave,” was released in September 2022 on Future Classic. Danielle continues to advocate for criminal justice reform and is an influential leader in the Black Lives Matter movement in Rochester, New York.

Daphne Willis, one of the co-founders of Eric Nadel’s Birthday Benefit, has been a Kessler favorite since she first played at the theater in 2011. Best known for her song “Somebody’s Someone,” which has been viewed more than 24 million times, Daphne is also a speaker for mental health and addiction recovery organizations. Her songs have had countless placements in TV, films, and commercials, and her ability to connect with an audience is second to none.

Sponsor tables and suites for this event are available through Grant Halliburton Foundation. Visit granthalliburton.org/ericnadel to learn more or to purchase a sponsorship. QUESTIONS? Email hannah@granthalliburton.org.

Bell Nunnally Presents the Eric Nadel Birthday Benefit for Grant Halliburton Foundation

Celebrating its 10th anniversary concert, the Eric Nadel Birthday Benefit supports the work of Grant Halliburton Foundation, a local nonprofit that provides mental health education, training, and support to North Texas teens and families.

Headlining this year’s show is Paris, Texas native Cas Haley, a former runner-up on America’s Got Talent and the 2020 winner of the national Chart Your Course songwriting contest sponsored by Lincoln. Selected out of 1,600 entries, Cas’ song Every Road I’m On won him a new Lincoln Corsair and a cross-country journey to work with famed songwriters and musicians like Jon Batiste, Ruthie Foster, and Jon Cleary. Plus, he was featured in a Lincoln commercial along with Matthew McConaughey.

Music is a family affair for Cas, who collaborates on songwriting with his wife Cassy, a recent cancer survivor. He tours with his son, Eben, on bass and his daughter, Nolah, on fiddle, who you will no doubt enjoy at this show.

Cas’ music reflects the reggae-pop influence of bands like UB40 and Sublime and celebrates the power of music, love, and family––a perfect fit for this event.

Daphne Willis, one of the co-founders of the Birthday Benefit, has been a Kessler favorite since she first played at the theater in 2011. Best known for her song Somebody’s Someone, which has been viewed more than 24 million times, Daphne is also a speaker for mental health and addiction recovery organizations. Her songs have had countless placements in TV, films, and commercials, and her ability to connect with an audience is second to none.

Sponsor tables are available through Grant Halliburton Foundation.
Visit 
granthalliburton.org/ericnadel to learn more or to purchase a sponsorship.
QUESTIONS? Email 
amy@granthalliburton.org

After a one year absence, Eric Nadel’s Birthday Benefit returns for its 9th edition. This will be a reduced capacity show. All proceeds will go to Grant Halliburton Foundation.

Since 2006, Grant Halliburton Foundation has worked to strengthen the network of mental health resources for children, teens and young adults to promote better mental health and prevent suicide in North Texas.  Learn more at GrantHalliburton.org.

Back for their first show since the pandemic caused their soulful jubilations to come to a grinding halt, East Dallas soul revelation Bastards of Soul is back up on the scene and ready to celebrate the Summer of Soul at this exclusive special event.

Rooted in infectious rhythm and blues from the late 60s heyday, BoS bring a funky backbone, warm textures and punchy brass for dynamic frontman Chadwick Murray to soar on top of.

It’s can’t stop/won’t stop super-dynamite soul all night long. So peep the Dallas Observer’s 2020 Album of the Year – BoS’ debut release Spinnin’ on Eastwood Music Group, and make sure you’re there for their triumphant return!

“You can hear the influences, and those, along with their original Texas sound will make your day whether you’re a soul lover or not“  – Flea Market Funk

Long-time Kessler favorite Daphne Willis will open the show. She has performed at most of Eric’s Birthday Benefits, including the inaugural show in 2012. Daphne’s hit song, “Somebody’s Someone” has touched millions of lives all over the world with over 25 million views. A newly re-visioned version of the song was recently released and is available at all the usual music sources.

 

TABLES AND SUITES ARE AVAILABLE IN SPONSORSHIPS THROUGH GRANT HALLIBURTON FOUNDATION. Click Here to learn more or to purchase a sponsorship.

 

 

 

 

In the rock’n’roll era, the vast spaces of west Texas have been filled with great music. Joe Ely stands in a tradition born out on these gritty plains. It includes Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly, Waylon Jennings, Tanya Tucker, Guy Clark, Delbert McClin- ton, Don Walser, Terry Allen, Lloyd Maines, his daughter Natalie Maines, and Joe’s enduring musical partners, Butch Hancock and Jimmie Dale Gilmore.
 
It is a land where you can see for miles and miles and miles. Only those who don’t know it find it barren. For it’s full of stories if you know where to seek them. And it has customs and amusements all its own. Even the forever dipping oil wells have their role. “In high school, we used to get somebody to buy us a six pack and go out there to the fields and ride the front part of those oil pumps all night long,” Joe remembers.
 
Now, Ely lives in Austin and spends much of his life on the road. But when he’s accumulated enough song ideas, Lubbock is where Joe heads. “Somehow, just driv- ing for hours down those country roads is still the best place for me finish my songs.”
 
Panhandle Rambler is one of the most personal albums Joe Ely’s ever made. It brings forth this terrain, the spirited people it produces and that special sense of destiny, be it terrible or glorious, that its very vastness creates. “Wounded Creek” starts the album with what you might call a Western fantasy, except that the “bushes and the brambles,” the traffic light, the stray dog and the cold wind are all completely brought to life.
 
“Sometimes, when I was a kid, you’d look outside and the only things you’d see would be these huge radio towers, must have been fifty of a hundred feet tall, just swaying in the wind,” Joe said. “Won- derin’ Where,” perhaps Panhandle Rambler’s most beautiful melody, pays tribute those trembling towers, the railroads which carried other things equally uni- maginable distances, the “cross between a river and a stream” where he played, and the dreams and nightmares that flitted across that kid’s mind and heart, and the loneliness of bearing such secrets. If it is possible to write a love song for a place, this is one of the great ones, “trying to find a verse that’s never been sung to hearts that need relief.”
 
“Here’s to the Weary” is the story of all the great musical refugees, from Woody Guthrie, Bob Wills and Muddy Waters to the rockabillies—Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, the shadows of the others—who soothed our “weary and restless souls” with nighttime musical magic.
 
It’s also typical of all the songs on the album. The place doesn’t necessarily al- ways win, but, as in “Magdalene” and “Coyotes are Howlin’,” it’s the one thing that carries a sense not so much of per- manence as of inevitably. The two sides are fully summarized in the almost giddy “Southern Eyes” and the fatalistic “Early in the Mornin’.”
 
Of course, every Lubbocker album needs its legendary tales. Here that terri- tory is covered by “Four Ol’ Brokes,” which combines a hobo yarn with the bal- lad of a gambling scam, and “Burden of
 
Your Load,” in which true love triumphs over evil, if just barely, we hope.
 
Equally legendary, but true in every re- spect, is the closing song, “You Saved Me,” which is a love song to Joe’s wife, Sharon. The lyric never mentions her name, but no one who’s known Joe Ely longer than about a day could mistake her.
 
Legendary tales and legendary musi- cians. Panhandle Rambler, largely re- corded in Austin, features some of the most respected local musicians: drummer Davis McClarty, guitarists Lloyd Maines and Robbie Gjersoe, Jeff Plankenhorm, and Gary Nicholson, bassist Glen Fu- kunaga. There were also Nashville ses- sions, with Music City’s usual superb playing, led by guitarist Gary Nicholson. Joe wrote all but two of the songs: “Mag- dalene” by Guy Clark and Ray Stephen- son, and “When the Nights are Cold” by his original Flatlanders sidekick Butch Hancock.
 
This is a classic Joe Ely album. It has moved me, every time I’ve heard it, with a certain kind of awe. One reason is that, long before you hear “You Saved Me,” he put everything he has into telling the world about a place in the world, and through that, reaching his own emotional center. It’s beautiful and it’s inspiring.

Kessler favorite Daphne Willis returns to open the show.