Tickets on sale to the public Friday, July 21st at 10am.

Long time friends (they went to college together!) Brett Dennen and John Craigie join together for a night of stunning songwriting and storytelling, including a special set on stage together.

Brett Dennen

A Northern California native, has been captivating audiences for nearly two decades with his distinct blend of folk-pop melodies, thought-provoking lyrics, and soulful vocal prowess. His signature red hair and lanky frame are as unmistakable as the music that has earned him legions of dedicated fans and critical acclaim.

Dennen's musical journey began in earnest at Camp Jack Hazard, a summer camp where he first discovered his love for singing and songwriting. Drawing inspiration from the likes of Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, and Joni Mitchell, Dennen crafted his own unique style that reflects his passion for storytelling and social commentary.

Dennen's debut album, Brett Dennen (2004), introduced the world to his undeniable talent and served as a springboard for a career that has since seen the release of several successful albums including So Much More (2006), Hope for the Hopeless (2008), Loverboy (2011), Smoke and Mirrors (2013), Por Favor (2016), and See The World (2021). Each record has showcased his evolution as an artist, with a growing mastery of his craft and the ability to convey complex emotions through his songwriting.

With a successful string of albums and several Top Ten AAA singles like “Make You Crazy,” “Wild Child,” and 2018’s “Already Gone.” His single “See The World,” off the album of the same name, reaching Top Five on the AAA charts, Dennen has cemented himself as a fixture in American pop/folk music. He released his most recent single, “This Is Going To Be The Year,” on Mick Music.

Dennen's live performances are characterized by his infectious energy and charisma, with each show a heartfelt expression of his love for music and connection with his audience. His insightful lyrics often touch on themes of love, nature, and social justice, resonating with fans who appreciate the genuine emotion and thoughtfulness behind his art.

In recent years, Brett Dennen has started to let the world in on his secrets. In 2017, he created the “Lift Series,” an annual tour wherein he combines shows in ski towns with conservation initiatives and education in each locale. An avid skier and surfer as well as a conservationist, Dennen works with local organizations to spearhead beach clean-ups and educate young people to become climate stewards, driving awareness through his music and marrying just a few of his many sides in one effort to help drive positive change. Despite the success of his career, Dennen’s connection to his roots remains. In 2022, he tapped into his love for the outdoors and summer camp memories, hosting the first annual Camp Dennen outdoor retreat at Constellation Creek in the greater Lake Tahoe area, establishing a space for community, nature, music, and art.

With his undeniable talent, magnetic stage presence, and unwavering dedication to his craft, Brett Dennen has carved out a unique niche for himself in the world of singer-songwriters. As he continues to evolve as an artist, fans and critics alike eagerly await the next chapter in this remarkable musician's storied career.

John Craigie

Portland, OR-based singer, songwriter, and producer John Craigie adapts moments of solitude into stories perfectly suited for old Americana fiction anthologies. Instead of leaving them on dog-eared
pages, he projects them widescreen in flashes of simmering soul and folk eloquence. On his 2022 full-length album, Mermaid Salt, we witness revenge unfurled in flames, watch a landlocked mermaid’s escape, and fall asleep under a meteor shower.

After selling out shows consistently coast-to-coast and earning acclaim from Rolling Stone, Glide Magazine, No Depression, and many more, his unflinching honesty ties these ten tracks together.

The album comes from the solitude and loneliness of lockdown in the Northwest. Someone whose life
was touring, traveling, and having lots of human interaction is faced with an undefinable amount of time without those things. So, he began writing new songs and envisioning an album that was different from his past records. The sound of everyone playing live in a room together was traded for the sound of song construction with an unknown amount of instruments and musicians—a quiet symphony.

Rather than steal away to a cabin or hole up in a house with friends, Craigie opted to set up shop at the OK Theater in Enterprise, OR with longtime collaborator Bart Budwig behind the board as engineer. A rotating cast of musicians shuffled in and out safely, distinguishing the process from the communal recording of previous releases. The core players included Justin Landis, Cooper Trail, and Nevada Sowle. Meanwhile, Shook Twins lent their signature vocal harmonies, Bevin Foley arranged, composed, and performed strings, and Ben Walden dropped in for guitar and violin plucking parts.

“Instruments were scattered around the theater and microphones placed in various spots,” he recalls. “It’s hard to say who all played what exactly.”

As such, the spirit in the room guided everyone. On “Distance,” warm piano glows alongside a glitchy
beat as he softly laments, “I could lose you to the loneliness, vast and infinite.” Then, there’s “Helena.” A jazz-y bass line snakes through head-nodding percussion as he relays an incendiary parable of a mother and son in exile. He croons, “She said fire was how we’d make ‘em pay. As I ran across the fields, she would scream, ‘Light it up son’,” uplifted in a conflagration of Shook Twins’ harmonies. Strings echo in the background as his vocals quake front-and-center on “Street Mermaid.”

Elsewhere, the guitar-laden “Microdose” beguiles and bewitches with an intoxicating refrain dedicated
to a time where he “Microdosed for months and months, dissolve my ego in the acid.” Everything culminates on the glassy beat-craft and glistening guitars of “Perseids” where he sings, “There’s always a new heart after the old heart. Maybe a new heart is enough.”

During this period, he explored the environment around him “from the Oregon coasts to the waterfalls” and read books about Levon Helm, Billie Holiday, and Ani DiFranco.

“I got time to silence all the noise and chaos of touring and look inward,” he observes.

Craigie had reached a series of watershed moments in tandem with Mermaid Salt. Beyond headlining
venues such as The Fillmore and gracing the stage of Red Rocks Amphitheater, his 2020 offering Asterisk The Universe earned unanimous tastemaker applause. Rolling Stone noted, “tracks like ‘Don’t Deny’ and ‘Climb Up’ bridge a Sixties and Seventies songwriter vibe with the laid-back cool of Jack Johnson, an early supporter of Craigie,” while Glide Magazine hailed it as “one of his best records.” Perhaps, No Depression put it best, “For many weary and heavy- listeners hearted, the album might be exactly what they need.” Along the way, he generated over 40 million total streams and counting, speaking to his unassuming impact.

In the end, Craigie offers a sense of peace on Mermaid Salt.

Donavon Frankenreiter’s new album, “The Heart,” officially marks the start of the singer-songwriter’s second decade as a solo recording artist. It’s been over ten years since the release of his self-titled debut, and in that time he has grown, not only as a musician, but also as a man. He’s raising a family and nurturing two creative careers-one onstage, one in the waves-but on top of all that, he’s still learning what makes him tick. And so, naturally, he named his album after his ticker.

“All these songs are as close to me singing from the heart as I can,” says Frankenreiter. “It’s a complete record; the songs are intertwined. I had to call it ‘The Heart,’ that was the theme of the record.”

The songs here are seriously sentimental, without question the heaviest material he has released to date. Part of that inspiration came from his co-writer, the prolific songwriter Grant-Lee Phillips, with whom Frankenreiter had collaborated in the past on his album “Pass It Around.” He recognized the ease with which the two worked together and sent Phillips a handful of new tunes and ideas. He was astonished at the brilliance of the songs that came back, and so quickly, but also by one of Phillips’ suggestions in particular.

“Grant told me, ‘You should make the most intimate and honest record you’ve ever made,'” says Frankenreiter. “So these songs are simple and intimate and honest, they aren’t cheeky. There’s some ups and downs-I love writing positive songs and happy tunes, but there are some downers here. I feel like it’s where I’m at, 42 years old. Every one of these songs means a lot to me. They’re from the heart.”

To record them, Frankenreiter booked two weeks of studio time in May of 2015 at Blue Rock Studios in Wimberley, Texas. But unlike the privacy afforded by most studios, these sessions were to be live-streamed on the Internet in a soul-baring exhibition for his fans-talk about intimate and honest. With just two bandmates and a studio engineer, Frankenreiter knocked out a song each day and recorded the entire album in full view of a watching public. He had never been so inspired, and embraced every aspect of the situation: the landscape, the lodging, the isolation, the overall challenge.

“We went in saying, ‘Let’s make the best record we can that we enjoy,'” he says. “And not that I didn’t feel that way about my other albums, but this was the one that felt the most natural. Even the way we made it, too, a song a day. I went into it feeling a little pressure, this whole live-streaming thing; if we hit a rut the first day, we’re screwed. But the first day we cut ‘Big Wave,’ and it was off to the races.”

The nature of the recording environment removed any “fuck-around” time and replaced it with the utmost efficiency and excitement. As Frankenreiter says, it was an experiment, and it invigorated the band, resulting in their most cohesive process to date.

“There’s something magical about Blue Rock Studios and Wimberley, Texas,” he says. “It’s really powerful, that’s one spot that is really bitching. This place is beautiful, a huge estate on 50 acres, cows walking by the windows while you’re recording-this open, amazing wilderness. We lived in the studio, and to record there and never have to leave, that’s the first time I ever made a record that way. Every morning you wake up and hit it again. I was in such a bubble; it was all about the music. I think about it now and it’s emotional.”

Throughout the process, he continued to have more encounters of the heart-some more literal than others. While recording “Woman,” it was noticed that a Tibetan singing bowl found in the studio was in the same key as the Heart Chakra, one of the centers of spiritual energy in the body, and both just so happened to be in the same key as the song. Someone played it, and the sound made the final cut on the album.

Elsewhere, the song “Little Shack” was culled from someone who shares Frankenreiter’s heartbeat: his 12-year-old son, Hendrix. “One night, at home in Hawaii, I was trying to write songs and my son was jamming on his electric,” he says. “I was like, ‘What is that song?’ and he said, ‘It’s just something I’ve been working on.’ He taught it to me, and I recorded it that night and sent it to Grant. Twenty-four hours later, Grant sent back the words. It kinda has that vibe of two people getting together: it doesn’t matter where you are in the world, I got everything I need right in front of me. It sounded like I wrote it, and Hendrix wrote the music. That was the first time that’s ever happened.”

Other moments on the album, like “Sleeping Good Night,” “The Way ?ou Catch the Light,” “When the River Bends” (co-written by Graham Colton and Phillips), and the aforementioned “Big Wave,” highlight emotions but also have about them an ease, a familiarity, a confidence that only comes from experience. These are songs that Frankenreiter could not have pulled off in his first decade. There is a rollicking comfort to them, but also those serious sentiments of love and loss, faith and joy and, more than anything, self-examination and freedom.

“I feel really lucky that I got into the game when I did,” he says. “I’m still lucky I’m able to make records and that we have a fan base and are able to tour. I started my own record label; it’s a way for me to make my own music the way I want to, on my own time, and to put it out my way. So many things have changed and I feel a little wiser than ten years ago. I learned a lot over the last decade, it went by really quick. It’s fun to have a new album done and to hit the road with a bunch of new songs, it rejuvenates you to do your thing.”

And, for now, Frankenreiter’s “thing” may be compassion. Perhaps most heavy on “The Heart” is its final song, “California Lights,” a tune written about Frankenreiter’s father’s battle with Leukemia. “It was written about my dad, who was dying during the making of this record. He died about two weeks after we finished it. It was pretty intense, a heavy song to record. I did that song in its completion three times, that’s

all I could only make it through. The live take of me playing the guitar and singing was the only way I could do it. I was seeing the heart everywhere.”

In those moments of emotional heaviness, Frankenreiter reaches for his guitar to guide him, for an escape. “I felt like I was completely in a bubble the whole time I recorded, I was so inside the music. I cried when I left the studio, and the guys in the band did, too; it was radical. It was like going back to reality. That’s what music does, you can definitely escape.”

A decade into his career, Donavon Frankenreiter has learned to listen to his ticker above all else. Doing so has allowed the light to come in from all the corners of his world, even those where there is darkness. Sharing the load with those he trusts, and especially with those he loves, he has seized the opportunity to take control of his craft, on his own terms, and to follow his own beat.

“I went into this album saying I wanted to make songs I love,” he says. “Whatever feels right, go ahead and record it, and worry about what happens after, afterwards. I’m proud of it. I go back to the title of the album, and in the song ‘You and Me,’ that chorus: ‘It’s gotta be from the heart/for it to start’… There’s so many things going on out there, everybody’s moving to the beat of a different drum, but I feel like all good things start from the heart.”